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(Created page with "cranberries, lingonberries, blueberries red [[Huckleberry|h...")
 
 
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[[Image:vaccinium.jpg|thumb|Epigynous berries are simple fleshy fruit. Clockwise from top right: [[Cranberry|cranberries]], [[lingonberries]], [[blueberries]] red [[Huckleberry|huckleberries]]]]
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'''Simple fruits''' can be either dry or fleshy, and result from the ripening of a simple or compound ovary in a flower with only one [[Carpel|pistil]]. Dry fruits may be either [[dehiscent]] (opening to discharge seeds), or indehiscent (not opening to discharge seeds). Types of dry, simple fruits, with examples of each, are:
 
Simple fruits can be either dry or fleshy, and result from the ripening of a simple or compound ovary in a flower with only one [[Carpel|pistil]]. Dry fruits may be either [[dehiscent]] (opening to discharge seeds), or indehiscent (not opening to discharge seeds). Types of dry, simple fruits, with examples of each, are:
 
 
*[[achene]] - Most commonly seen in aggregate fruits (e.g. [[strawberry]])
 
*[[achene]] - Most commonly seen in aggregate fruits (e.g. [[strawberry]])
 
*[[Capsule (fruit)|capsule]] – ([[Brazil nut]])
 
*[[Capsule (fruit)|capsule]] – ([[Brazil nut]])
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*[[silicle]] – ([[shepherd's purse]])
 
*[[silicle]] – ([[shepherd's purse]])
 
*[[utricle (fruit)|utricle]] – ([[beet]])
 
*[[utricle (fruit)|utricle]] – ([[beet]])
[[Image:Lilyfruit.jpg|upright|thumb|''[[Lilium]]'' unripe capsule fruit]]
 
 
Fruits in which part or all of the ''pericarp'' (fruit wall) is fleshy at maturity are ''simple fleshy fruits''. Types of fleshy, simple fruits (with examples) are:
 
Fruits in which part or all of the ''pericarp'' (fruit wall) is fleshy at maturity are ''simple fleshy fruits''. Types of fleshy, simple fruits (with examples) are:
 
*[[berry]] – ([[redcurrant]], [[gooseberry]], [[tomato]], [[cranberry]])
 
*[[berry]] – ([[redcurrant]], [[gooseberry]], [[tomato]], [[cranberry]])
 
*stone fruit or [[drupe]] ([[plum]], [[cherry]], [[peach]], [[apricot]], [[olive]])
 
*stone fruit or [[drupe]] ([[plum]], [[cherry]], [[peach]], [[apricot]], [[olive]])
 
[[Image:DewberriesWeb.jpg|left|thumb|upright|[[Dewberry]] flowers. Note the multiple [[pistil]]s, each of which will produce a [[drupe]]let. Each flower will become a blackberry-like [[aggregate fruit]].]]
 
An aggregate fruit, or ''etaerio'', develops from a single flower with numerous simple pistils.
 
 
*[[Magnolia]] and [[Peony]], collection of follicles developing from one flower.
 
*[[Sweet gum]], collection of capsules.
 
*[[Sycamore]], collection of achenes.
 
*[[Teasel]], collection of cypsellas
 
*[[Tuliptree]], collection of samaras.
 
   
 
The [[pome]] fruits of the family [[Rosaceae]], (including [[apple]]s, [[pear]]s, [[rosehip]]s, and [[saskatoon berry]]) are a syncarpous fleshy fruit, a simple fruit, developing from a half-inferior ovary.
 
The [[pome]] fruits of the family [[Rosaceae]], (including [[apple]]s, [[pear]]s, [[rosehip]]s, and [[saskatoon berry]]) are a syncarpous fleshy fruit, a simple fruit, developing from a half-inferior ovary.

Latest revision as of 15:23, May 31, 2012

Simple fruits can be either dry or fleshy, and result from the ripening of a simple or compound ovary in a flower with only one pistil. Dry fruits may be either dehiscent (opening to discharge seeds), or indehiscent (not opening to discharge seeds). Types of dry, simple fruits, with examples of each, are:

Fruits in which part or all of the pericarp (fruit wall) is fleshy at maturity are simple fleshy fruits. Types of fleshy, simple fruits (with examples) are:

The pome fruits of the family Rosaceae, (including apples, pears, rosehips, and saskatoon berry) are a syncarpous fleshy fruit, a simple fruit, developing from a half-inferior ovary.

Schizocarp fruits form from a syncarpous ovary and do not really dehisce, but split into segments with one or more seeds; they include a number of different forms from a wide range of families. Carrot seed is an example.

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